The Visual System (Part 2)

In Part 1, I gave an example of how I like to learn about a topic, any topic.

In my example, I learned about the visual system from a visual system.

In my experience, the visual system of the picture story is one of the most effective learning materials that I have used.

In my opinion, picture stories could be used to teach more kinds of people more kinds of things. In particular, they could be used to teach people academic subjects like neuroscience and functional skills like cooking dinner. In particular particular, they could be used to teach the same person both neuroscience and cooking dinner. In particular particular particular, that lucky charmy person could be me.

This picture story is about why picture stories work for me, and maybe others too.

For me, picture stories work, because picture stories have lots of pictures.

I learn well from pictures, because pictures are easy for me to suck into my brain and spew out of my brain. I am good at storing the pictures that I see, and I am good at retrieving the pictures that I store. In my brain, the storage and retrieval of pictures are eezy breezy, speedy feedy operations, and such has been the case for as long as I can remember. I have an excellent visual memory, and I remember most of the pictures that I see. I am better at remembering pictures than videos or scenes from real life. I may or may not remember a video, but freeze-frame it, frame-by-frame, and I will remember the frames, one-by-one. I may or may not remember a real-life scene, but photograph it, click click click, and I will remember the photographs, clickety-click.

I will remember the pictures in a picture story.

Remembering is a big part of learning.

Not only do picture stories have lots of pictures, but picture stories have lots of versions of the same picture. This is because the picture story maker is lazy, verry merry berry. To make a picture story, it is easier for the picture story maker to make lots of versions of the same picture than lots of different pictures. In my picture story about the visual system, I made fifteen different versions of the same flat cat to show the parts of the visual system, then a couple more to show the whole.

In my visual memory, the versions are stored and retrieved effortlessly, one-by-one, click click click. In my mind is a big book of pictures, and it is and has always been effortless for me to add pictures to the book, get pictures from the book, play with pictures in the book, and make pictures for the book. It doesn’t matter how many different versions of the same flat cat that I see. I like seeing them, over and over and over, again and again and again, repeat repeat repeat, and I learn well from them, click click click. Eezy Breezy, Speedy Feedy, Kreepy Keepy, my brain sucks them in to prowl, pounce, and purrr, happily ever after, in my big picture book.

I am a picture thinker, and thinking in pictures is my strength.
Moar Moar Moar, the moar pictures, the bester.

I like repetition, and repetition is my strength.
Moar Moar Moar, the moar pictures, the bester.

Picture stories work for me by using my strengths.

Alternatively, I could have been lazier, moar moar moar. Instead of making fifteen different versions of the same flat cat to show the parts, one-by-one, I could have made one flat cat to show the whole, the big picture. Then, I could have described the big picture in the text, the big block of text separate from the picture that the text describes, so I could have written a textbook instead.

I didn’t do that, because I hate that. I hate learning that way, from big blocks of text with few pictures, the text separate from the pictures that the text describes. I hate textbooks. I hate their text, and I hate their pictures. Their text is long and boring, and their pictures are ugly and cluttered. It is hard for me to learn anything that I don’t already know from the text and pictures of a textbook. There is too much krap in the text, and there is too much krap in the pictures. Reading the krappy text, all krapped all over with krap, is a krappy non-learning experience, and so is seeing the krappy pictures, all krapped all over with krap. Krap, there is too much of it hitting me in the face all at the same time from the text and pictures of a textbook. I prefer it to land on my head, one blob at a time, instead.

In a picture story, the krap lands on my head, one blob at a time, instead. Unlike the pictures in a textbook, the pictures in a picture story are simple, showing only one thing at a time, the one thing that I am learning about at the time. For each picture showing one thing, there is a blurb of text telling a few things about the one thing in the picture. If I want to tell a few more things about the one thing, then I need to make another picture to show the one thing about which I want to tell a few more things. For each picture showing one thing, I am only allowed to tell a few things about it in the text. This way, I can learn all the krap that I want to learn, blob-by-blob, and I can get out of the way of too much krap hitting me in the face, covering up my eyes, and shutting down my brrrainzzz, my beautiful precious brrrainzzz.

Picture.
Text.

Picture.
Text.

Picture.
Text.

This is the alternating pattern of pictures and words in a picture story, each combination of picture and text representing one concept at a time, the sequence of concepts telling the story of the system from the parts to the whole. It doesn’t matter what the system is, whether the visual system of the brain (qoooooool) or the chicken pot pie system (yum yum yum) or the pineapple upside-down cake system (yum yum yum) or the Thanksgiving Dinner Food Fest system (yum yum yum yum yum yum yum) or the gingerbread house for German class system (droooooool) or the Ramen noodle every night system (yum yum yum yum yuck yuck yuck).

From the parts, build up the whole, one part at a time.
From the parts, build up the whole, one picture for a part.
From the parts, build up the whole, one blurb for a picture.

In my general overview of the visual system, each of the parts was seen, one part at a time. The whole was built up from the parts, one picture for a part and one blurb for a picture. The whole was seen fifteen times, each time that each part was seen. By the end of the story, all the parts had been seen, one-by-one, and the whole from the parts many times, so the end, not the beginning, was where the big picture showed all the parts all at once in the whole.

See the parts, one at a time.
See the whole, many times.

See the whole from the parts, one at a time.
See the parts in the whole, all at the same time.

Is it burrrrrrrned into your brrrainzzz yet?

Into mine, it is.

For me, the visual system of the picture story works, for the reasons pictured in this story. Not only does it work, but it plays. It is not work, but play, to learn this way, because it is fun and easy and natural. When I am learning this way, there is nothing unnatural for me to overcome. There are no big blocks of text to read. I hate reading big blocks of text. There are no ugly cluttered pictures to see. I hate seeing ugly cluttered pictures. There are no people talking at me. There are no people looking at me. There are no people hovering over me. There are no people hanging around me. There are no people in my presence. I hate having people in my presence when I learning something. The presence of people interferes with the functioning of my beautiful precious brrrainzzz, and I learn much better alone and on my own, paper to brain or screen to mind.

Paper to brain or screen to mind, there are only pictures and words, strong and simple and pure. See the pictures, click click click. Read the words, clickety-click. Pictures and words, suck them in, Thhhewww, Thhhewww, Thhhewww, (frog-tongued frog-food sucking noises). Pictures and words, spew them out, Pewww, Pewww, Pewww (poison dart frog poison-dart spewing noises).

Thhhewww! Thhhewww! Thhhewww!

Pewww! Pewww! Pewww!

Mewww! Mewww! Mewww!

Unlike people, cats don’t interfere with the functioning of my beautiful precious brrrainzzz.

Instead, they help, and that is why they are all over the picture stories of my blog.

The other reason is that I am totally obsessed with them. I am totally obsessed with cats and brrrainzzz, and my one and only autistic savant skill is superimposing cats and brrrainzzz onto each other.

Aren’t they quuute? Aren’t they qoooooool?

Worries, if they’re not. I’m sure that you’ll be seeing them again…and again…and again…click click click click click click click!

About these ads

2 thoughts on “The Visual System (Part 2)

  1. Pingback: The Visual System (Part 1) | Autistic And Awesome

  2. Pingback: When the Dorsal Stream is Shallow | The VisionHelp Blog

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s